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Teen Kids News

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PBS

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast

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Channel 71 (507 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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528

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Vienna 8, Us 6, Europe 4, U.s. 3, Nicole 2, Brown 2, Strauss 2, Gianni 2, Jacqueline 2, Del Sol 2, Honda 2, Kia Optima 2, Carina 2, Johann 2, Mr. Morgan 2, Mr. Naidu 2, Austria 2, Latin 2, New York 2, David Lee Miller 1,
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  PBS    Teen Kids News    News/Business.  (CC) (Stereo)  

    November 3, 2012
    4:00 - 4:30pm PDT  

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>> "teen kids news" is about to get started, and here's what we've got for you. >> would you eat a bowl of cookies for breakfast? wait till you find out what could be in your cereal. >> we'll see how flowers, rocks, gold, and even bugs were used to make beautiful books. >> meet the people who make sure no teen gets priced out of the prom. >> while the movie "spider-man" may make you think more kindly of spiders, getting bitten by one is no fun. i'll tell you what you'll need to do. >> coming up, i'll show you the unusual way they celebrate the new year in the land of mozart -- vienna, austria. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us.
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>> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> you might think of it as a healthy way to start the day, but you could be eating a bowl full of trouble. tyler has the disturbing truth about some of our favorite cereals. >> i think it's very nutritional. >> yeah, but it depends on what cereal. >> if you think your favorite cereal is healthy, here's a shock. it might be more than half sugar. and that's not sweet. >> it's been linked to obesity, diabetes. and when you eat tons and tons of it, you're obviously more at risk of developing type 2 diabetes or becoming more obese. >> that's why 84 popular cereals were tested by the environmental working group. they're a private organization dedicated to protecting the health of the public and the planet. they found that most of the cereals -- in fact, three out of
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four of them -- failed nutrition guidelines, guidelines that are set by the federal government. these cereals may taste good, but would you want to eat them? >> if the government was saying it's unhealthy, i would assume that it can be harmful to your body, so i wouldn't want to. >> the guidelines are voluntary. they ask that cereal not be more than 26% sugar by weight. but some cereal makers seem to be ignoring that big time. the worst offenders are more than 50% sugar. >> it's kind of surprising what we found -- that a number of cereals have more sugar than a twinkie, and this is a snack dessert that, you know, has a lot of sugar and is heavily processed. >> to figure out how much sugar is in a cereal, read the label. the government requires all food makers to list ingredients. keep in mind, that added sugar has many names. so other names of sugar on the ingredient list could be honey, high fructose corn syrup,
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molasses is an added -- "an added sugar," as well. and these are -- on the ingredient labels, they're listed based on the amount that's in the food. >> that's important to remember. the next most used ingredient is listed second, and so on. >> i did not know ingredients were listed in the order of the amount. >> if some form of sugar heads the list, watch out. your cereal has more sugar than any other ingredient. >> there are some cereals that do meet the guidelines, and that, you know, you could be okay to eat in the morning. >> we all need the healthy boost that breakfast gives us to get us energized for the school day. and some sugar is okay, but too big a spoonful of sugar could make the grades go down. >> we'll be back with more "teen kids news" in just a few moments. >> stick with us.
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>> lance armstrong losing the titles that made him a cycling legend, the international cycling union stripping him of all seven tour de france titles and banning him from the sport for life on the heels of a u.s. anti-doping agency report that concluded he cheated throughout his career by using steroids, the blood booster epo, and blood transfusions -- claims he continues to deny. armstrong telling a crowd of cyclists at a fundraiser he faced a very difficult few weeks. >> people ask me a lot, "how you doing?" and i tell them. i say, "well, i've been better, but i've also been worse." >> longtime sponsors nike, trek bicycles, and anheuser-busch dropping him. armstrong also stepping down as chairman of livestrong, the cancer-awareness charity he founded 15 years ago. >> former cuban leader fidel castro contradicting reports that he is on his deathbed, writing an article in a state newspaper criticizing
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western media and those who spread rumors. that paper also publishing what it claims are recent photos of the 86-year-old revolutionary. castro rarely making public appearances after stepping down in 2006 following a severe illness and handing power to his brother raul. thousands of pilgrims flooding st. peter's square in vatican city as pope benedict xvi named seven new saints. two were american -- kateri tekakwitha, the first native-american saint from the u.s... >> it almost makes me cry i'm so happy. we looked forward to this day for so long, and it's wonderful. i'm very happy. >> ...and mother marianne cope, a 19th-century franciscan nun who cared for leprosy patients in hawaii. for "teen kids news," i'm david lee miller, "fox news channel in the classroom." [ crowd singing in latin ]
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>> long, long before there was this... and even long, long before there was this... there was this. [ men chanting ] more than a thousand years ago, monks labored lovingly to create manuscripts -- the books of the medieval ages. made by hand, they were also works of art. the pages are so brilliantly decorated, they seem to give off light. that's why these are called illuminated manuscripts. that old craft comes to life again at manhattan's morgan library and museum. the morgans were famous bankers, and they were passionate about books. >> so, officially, welcome now to mr. morgan's library. i want to take us right away, actually, into mr. morgan's reading room, which is the room with the majority of the books, the majority of his 15,000 books. >> these students are part of an educational program run by the library.
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>> get close enough that you can see the handwritten text, and that you can see the hand-painted paintings that we were talking about. >> to illuminate manuscripts, the monks used many colors. but the most prized was gold. real gold. called gold leaf, it's even thinner than a leaf from a tree. >> you would have enough gold from that plum-sized nugget of gold to cover the floor of an entire tennis court. cool, right? that's how thin that gold is. >> while these students are getting their first look at illuminated manuscripts, these students are learning how they were made. >> basically, it's my first initial, and we got to design around our first initial. >> what you do is you blow your hot air onto the glue dots, and then you take the gold and you press it on. >> and then you get to use real gold and stick it on, and then you just have gold on your paper. it's really cool. >> what else is cool is the glue the monks used in the old days.
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it was made from fish guts. >> and everyone's gonna get an opportunity to do something, okay? >> the students learned that most colors came from nature. >> they used the flower to make the yellow, just like things like that to make paint... >> and purple, it came from this -- it's cochineal it's a type of bug. >> cochineal is a bug that comes from mexico, and it gave us a sort of a red color, as well. and what we do here is we actually grind it in order to create the pigments that the children are using. >> and the last color -- blue -- it came from this mineral called lapis lazuli. that blue is really nice. >> the lapis lazuli blue stone was so rare and expensive, you had to get it from afghanistan, you had to hike up the hindu kush mountains, so it became tied to either the royalty or the most important cathedrals, to show that they were the ones capable and wealthy enough to get this resource. >> you might call this an
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illuminating experience. these students now have a new appreciation for what it once took to make a book. >> they just like discovering how long an average illuminated manuscript might take -- three to five years to make a single book is sort of a wow factor. >> i used to think that manuscripts were just like pictures of things that were just, like, beautiful. and then now i think that it's really hard to make and it takes a lot of work and that it really reflects on history. >> there's one more very important part of history here at the morgan library. >> and we have, as i call it, "the big bang of writing" in our library. >> that's the famous gutenberg bible. it's the first book printed with moveable type, meaning it was made with the help of a machine. that sped up the process of printing and lowered its cost. and that meant the universe of reading would expand to include everyone.
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>> prom. it's one of the biggest events of school. sadly, there are kids across the country who don't go to prom because their family just can't afford it. but as carina reports, there's an organization that can help. >> there's no argument, prom can be expensive. prom tickets, hair and nails, pre-prom dinner, boutonnieres and flowers, maybe even a limo. [ sloop! ] you're already talking big bucks. and we haven't even mentioned what you're going to wear. [ cash register dings ] that's why this particular shopping experience is very special. all the dresses here have been donated. and they're to be given -- for free -- to students. this program is called operation prom, and it was started by a woman who used to work as an event planner. >> and i was planning lots of weddings, meeting brides with their bridesmaids that were going to have these bridesmaids' dresses that they were never
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gonna wear again. so, it inspired me to give them back to girls who were in need of dresses for their prom. >> there are dresses in every imaginable color, size and style. and they're in great condition because almost every one of them has been worn only once, if at all. who donates the clothes? >> we get dresses from everywhere, from people just cleaning out their closet to stores that have to get rid of inventory. >> jacqueline is miss westchester teen. she gave operation prom the gown she wore for her beauty pageant. >> i donated my winning dress because i felt amazing in it and i wanted other girls to have that same feeling when they're going to their prom. >> jacqueline is one of the many teen volunteers here today to make finding the right dress easy and fun. >> i'm helping girls pick out dresses for their prom. and i'm around that age of where girls are getting ready for prom, so i'm just as excited as they are to find that perfect dress. >> no, this lady's not looking for a dress for herself. one of her students couldn't make it here today, so she's
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shopping for her with a little help from technology. so how did you find one for her? >> well, i went around, looked at different colors that she requested, and then i took pictures, i sent them to her, and she replied. >> the reactions i see from the students is excitement. they're ready for their night, they're so excited that their dress fits, and it's just so nice to see them happy and that they just can't wait for their night. >> operation prom isn't just about dresses. >> it's not just for girls. we have partnerships with some tuxedo companies that will help us give tuxedos to boys going to proms, as well. >> in addition to the outfits, there's also tons of accessories. how does someone apply for clothing, and how do they prove they need the help? >> well, the student does have to fill out an application, and they need to see their guidance counselor or social worker, who will approve them for the program. they do need to be in financial need, and they have to be passing all of their classes.
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>> started in new york, operation prom is expanding to states across the country. in addition, it's also offering school supplies and scholarships, as well. to find out more, check the link on our website. when cinderella had nothing to wear to the ball, her fairy godmother saved the day. [ twinkle, twinkle! ] here in the real world, it's operation prom to the rescue. i'm carina for "teen kids news." >> first aid -- it's something we all should know. here's this week's report. >> little miss muffet had it right. when that spider sat down beside her, she ran away.
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and while many of us would do exactly what little miss muffet did, for the most part, spiders are harmless, right? >> in the u.s., the vast majority of spiders are not dangerous to humans. >> so if we're bitten by a harmless spider, do we need to apply first aid? >> yes, wash that spider bite with soap and water two or three times a day until it heals. also, you can apply a cold compress, which is basically just an ice pack. just make sure that there is a piece of cloth between your skin and the ice. >> what spiders are dangerous? >> hmm. there's two of main concern. first is the black widow. it's identified by this red hourglass, but it's on the underside of its body. the second is the brown recluse, which also has a marking on its back in the shape of a violin. if you think you've been stung by either of these spiders, call 911. >> you know, the more i learn about spiders, the more i'm convinced that they're just little, ugly, disgusting creatures. ugh! for "teen kids news," i'm emily. >> to mark our 10th year on tv,
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each week we take a look back at one of the stories we've covered. [ classical music plays ] >> when ballet first began, the performers were all men. eventually, the number of male ballet dancers dwindled because some didn't consider it masculine. our own reporter gianni gave it a twirl to show us ballet is not just for girls. >> okay, let's go, gentlemen. >> this ballet class is for boys only. >> ready? [ piano plays ] stomach in, please. chest up. >> most of these guys started dancing a couple of years ago. so how do you keep your students who are boys coming back to class? >> really, the key to keeping young men coming back to class is training them separately from the young ladies. and one. don't turn those legs out so much, please, and... >> mr. naidu is the head of the dance theater of harlem school.
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i recently joined one of his classes. what did your friends think? were you worried that they might tease you? >> no, because i'm not insecure about myself. i'm very confident in what i do. >> mr. naidu's class shows us why boys' ballet training can be compared to sports. >> men or young boys are more apt to be more competitive. they're a lot more physical, they certainly can't stand still for long periods of time and focus on great detail, so, in training them, we use their natural instincts. we use their competitive edge. get it. come on get it. >> ballet also can help with flexibility and coordination. that can be used on the football field and the basketball court. >> if you watch a player on the court going up into the air, turning around once, and then dunking the ball, it's called a 360, right? well, most people don't realize that ballet dancers, male dancers, do an equivalent, but it's a 720 -- that's two circles
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in the air. that's what we call a double tour en l'air. >> this class isn't ready for a 720, but other jumps are part of the training. after class, these dancers are exhausted. >> we usually, like, get drinks, eat, because we're losing a lot of energy, but it's actually really fun. >> some people think ballet is easier than sports, but i know from experience it's not. for "teen kids news," i'm gianni. >> this report is brought to you by orange county auto show. >> well, it's fall outside, but inside, it's all about the new season of auto shows.
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let's start by talking about a car that a lot of families, i think, will be interested in because it gets such great gas mileage. the all new kia optima, it's a hybrid. i like this car 'cause it doesn't look like the traditional hybrid. it'll get mom and dad 40 miles to the gallon, and the seats, they heat or they cool. how cool is that? and look at the graphics inside the car. it's all about high tech. you can punch up and see just how much gas mileage you're getting. the new kia optima, about $26,000. it's in showrooms right now. well, another car that gets great gas mileage for the whole family is this from ford. it is the c-max energy. you can get it in a plug-in hybrid or traditional hybrid. it's made in michigan, right here in the u.s. 47 miles to the gallon, and check this out. if mom or dad have their hands full with a package, you just put your foot under the tailgate, and it lifts up automatically. it's in showrooms now. $25,000 from ford. well, we've all seen honda accords before, but
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they're all new for this year and with a lot more styling. this, for 2013, the accord is filled with a lot of high-tech features on the inside. outside? pretty good-looking, as well. check that camera out. when you put the turn signal on, it'll tell you and show you where the blind spot is, making it a lot safer for the whole family. $21,600 from honda. and a lot of folks are seeing commercials for this car. this is the all-new dodge dart. it looks a lot like the italian alfa romeo because the companies are joined, and a lot of the styling effects are from alfa. it has 52 led lights on the inside. you can choose one of any 12 different colors. on sale right now, just $15,000 in dodge dealerships. and this, from chevy, the all-new chevy spark for 2013. it's chevrolet's first mini car, but still a family of four can drive around pretty comfortably. 10 standard airbags -- it makes it very, very safe, and it'll be on sale in showrooms this month. $12,995.
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a lot of cars that are super family friendly and ready to be driven home. i'm doug brauner in orange county, california, for "teen kids news." >> when you think of new year's eve, you probably think of watching the ball drop on tv. nicole shows us how a famous, old city in europe ushers in the new year. [ classical music plays ] >> vienna is the capital of austria. nicknamed the "city of music," mozart, beethoven, strauss, and many others composed and performed here. so it's no surprise that when it comes to ringing in the new year, vienna does it with music. lots of music. in fact, new year's eve here is a giant, traveling party called silvesterpfad. that means "the new year's trail." instead of being jammed into a single location like new york's times square, in vienna, the
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celebration takes place all over town, and it starts early. [ merengue music plays ] if you like the latin beat, there's music from the dominican republic called merengue. the name comes from meringue, a dessert made from whipped egg whites. apparently, people thought the dancers looked like human egg beaters. beats me. [ indistinct conversations ] >> these people are learning to do the waltz -- vienna's gift to the world. [ crowd shouts ] as day turns into evening, the lights get brighter, and the crowds get bigger. it seems like the entire city is on the move, hearing all kinds of sounds. [ drums play ] african rhythm. >> ♪ i fell for you like a child ♪ >> american country-western. [ rock 'n' roll plays ] there's rock 'n' roll. >> ♪ you were always on my mind ♪ >> even elvis. >> ♪ you were always on my mind ♪
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>> but my personal fave was this one. >> are you ready? >> ♪ it's fun to stay at the ymca ♪ >> [ singing operatically ] >> not far away, opera lovers were singing along, too, to "die fledermaus," which means "the bat." written by strauss' son, johann, jr., the plot's too complicated to explain right now, but fledermaus is young johann's most famous operetta. and the sachertorte is vienna's most famous dessert. served everywhere, but especially here at café sacher. this delicious chocolate cake was invented almost two centuries ago by a 16-year-old apprentice chef. sweet. as midnight approaches, vienna's giant amusement park takes center stage. when the hour strikes, all eyes are on the skies as the new year starts with a bang. [ fireworks crackling ]
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ringing in the new year, vienna style. for "teen kids news," i'm nicole. >> that's "teen kids news" for now. thanks for tuning in. >> we'll be back next week. see you then. u
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steves: from granada, it's a two-hour drive over the mountains and down into europe's fun-in-the-sun headquarters, the costa del sol. i find this strip of mediterranean coastline generally overbuilt and very commercialized. malaga, the major city of the coast, is a good place to pass through. and almost anything even resembling a quaint fishing village is long gone, replaced by time-share condos and golf courses. the big draw is the beaches. there are plenty of hotels, and sun worshipers enjoy themselves in spite of the congestion and lack of charm or local culture. nearly every country from europe's drizzly north tucks an expatriate community somewhere along this coast.
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they don't want to leave their culture, just their weather. my favorite costa del sol stop is the resort town of nerja. while capitalizing on the holiday culture, nerja has retained some of its charm. the church fronts the square, which fronts the beach, and everybody's out strolling, eventually winding up on the proud "balcony of europe" terrace. this bluff, jutting jauntily into the sea, overlooks miles of coastline. a castle occupied this spot for centuries. nerja's castle was part of a 16th-century lookout system. after reconquista forces drove out the muslim -- oh! that's right. you don't come to the costa del sol for history, you come for fun in the sun and relaxation. and relax is what countless expat residents do. nerja's expats are mostly british. like many along this coast, they actually try not to integrate.
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they enjoy their english tv and radio, and many barely learn a word of spanish. nerja has several well-equipped beaches. the one just below town retains its fishing-village charm. fishermen do their thing... while the tourists do theirs. the humble cottage evokes a bygone day. spaniards love their little beach restaurants. a short hike takes us to a broader beach that appeals to different tastes. while it's packed through the summer, we're here in may, when the heat and crowds are just right. ayo's place is famous for its beachside all-you-can-eat paella feast. for 30 years, he's been cooking up this classic spanish specialty. to create this culinary work of art, start with some junk pallets for fuel and slip on your handmade heat shields. then, fry up as many pieces of chicken
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as can fit in the pan. add just a pinch of garlic and about a week's pay's worth of saffron. when the chicken is golden brown, add a dozen skinned tomatoes and as many red and green peppers as you can stand chopping. stir everything with a clean shovel. now, add a laundry bin of arborio rice and just a dash of smoked sweet pimentos. stir briskly until the rice has become coated with the oils and spices. add a few gallons of stock and bring to a boil. add another pallet if necessary. mix in a boatload of fresh whole shrimp. when the rice is done, remove, remembering to lift with your knees, and let set for 10 minutes. now, you could just stare at the pretty colors and textures, but i recommend eating it for the full experience. dish out servings daintily and garnish with a wedge of lemon.
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feeds 48 hungry vacationers. adjust recipe measurements accordingly.

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